Hurst Castle laser scanning: part 2

Hurst Castle laser scanning: part 2

All finished at Hurst Castle by noon Wednesday, with the last bits of fiddly photography on the interiors of the gun battery and watch post (circular buildings are not ideal for rectified photos!). It’s been a great few days with very nice weather, but unfortunately the bright sunlight made for some challenging photography as my shadow constantly got in the way of shots!

It’s been a good opportunity to be refreshed in using GPS systems and working with a Leica total station, with great help from my HE colleagues. The next step now we’re back in the office is to process the data to produce the accurate plans requested – another new process to learn for my placement!

Of course, I had to take some photos of the friendly animals we met on the trip, including Lancelot, the hotel’s ginger tom cat, and two black labs from Hurst Castle who accompanied us on the ferry ride back to dry land.

 

Hurst Castle WWII watchpost laser scanning

Hurst Castle WWII watchpost laser scanning

It’s the first time I’ve had to take a ferry to site! First built under Henry VIII, Hurst Castle has been greatly modified and developed over the centuries, and was a significant defensive centre during WWII. Our task is to produce architectural drawings of WWII defence features on the site.

So far, two gloriously sunny (but very cold) days of survey work using a Faro laser scanner and Leica total station have allowed us to fully record the interiors and exteriors of two gun batteries and the watch tower in between. This is to better understand their structures to aid in conservation and maintenance.

Standing on the top of the fort’s roof, you get amazing views of the Isle of Wight and surrounding area – but it’s a good job I was securely harnessed by the great team from Vertical Technologies!

Just a little more photography for me to do tomorrow, our last day at this amazing site (for now!).

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