Travels to Thurso, Caithness and Brochtoberfest!

Travels to Thurso, Caithness and Brochtoberfest!

This blog post comes a fair bit delayed as I’ve been so busy travelling to different events over the last month (and now settling back into scan processing in the office at Bradford), but I wanted to say thanks to Iain McClean and Ken McElroy of the Caithness Broch Project for inviting me up to Thurso to speak at their fantastically-named Brochtoberfest seminar – an annual event where broch-related researchers and enthusiasts gather to hear about the latest in broch-related studies and archaeological work. It was a sell-out event, and located in the wonderful Caithness Horizons Museum – well worth a visit to see its impressive collection of carved Pictish stones.

 

Dan Harris talks about building the Lego Broch

 

It was great to meet other broch researchers and be informed on the many interesting activities being done to study and present these sites and their archaeology. I also got to see the impressive Lego broch model on display in the museum, which was fun (much heated discussion was heard about the features the model includes, and also the technical difficulties of modelling a round tower using square bricks…!). Dr Samantha Dennis also brought some artefacts from the Old Scatness Broch excavations with her, for her presentation on cataloguing the finds in the Shetland Museum, which were great for the attendees to handle.

 

The famed Lego Broch on display at Caithness Horizons! The level of detail is fanastic – note the smoked fish inside, and intra-mural galleries between the walls!

 

I must add a thank you to the owners of Pennyland House B&B for their kind hospitality during my stay in Thurso. I explored the town and nearby Scrabster the day after the festival, before I caught the train back down south (main image at the top shows the view of the island of Hoy, Orkney, from outside Pennyland House, plus some rather sleepy sheep!). An interesting fact: Thurso station is the most northerly in the UK, so I travelled quite literally to the end of the line! It’s a very scenic journey, spotting many deer and birds of prey on the way. I must visit some of Caithness’s broch sites the next time I am in northern Scotland.

 

The historic Pennyland House B&B

 

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