Last Monday we arrived late into Kirkwall, so had an overnight stop before heading across to the island of Rousay on the local ferry. The site was abuzz with media coverage from the exciting news of a Roman coin being discovered in a trench over the weekend (only the fourth ever found in Orkney). Here’s the BBC article (click).

Over two days me and Andy helped to scan the newly revealed contexts inside the trenches as well as wide-ranging contextual laser scans of the complete site at Swandro, with its Neolithic chambered tomb, Iron Age roundhouses and Pictish buildings. The stony shore made for some interesting stability challenges in finding secure places for tripod legs! Our latest scans are important as they are a record of the present condition of the site. The Knowe of Swandro is greatly under threat of coastal erosion, which is why the Swandro – Orkney Coastal Archaeology Trust are excavating and recording the site before it is completely claimed by the sea. Their great website has a daily blog as the season continues: http://www.swandro.co.uk/

 

transporting the anvil
On Wednesday this stone anvil was lifted from Structure 3. The Bradford Visualisation trolley makes a good lithics transporting device! Julie looks pleased!

 

It will be very interesting to examine the extent of erosion over the last few years by comparing this season’s scans to those of previous years (many thanks to Mark Littlewood for sharing his previous scans at Swandro with me).

 

scanning from photo platform
Setting up a long range scan from the top of the photography platform at Swandro

 

Even though we were rained off site on Thursday, me and Andy made a determined attempt to see a lot of the archaeology of the island up close, only after we were finally torn away from the lovely local arts and crafts (and ice cream) sold at The Craft Hub. I’m now the proud owner of a locally made “Rousay” souvenir mug complete with Viking longship!

In the afternoon we drove around the island and walked along the Westness coast, stopping by Midhowe Chambered Cairn – a monumentally-sized Neolithic cairn that is now housed inside a protective structure. There is a walkway directly over the exposed interior, which is quite an experience. I recommend stout boots with good grip walking down there from the car park – it’s quite steep and slippery! Very close by is Midhowe Broch, which is very well-preserved and in a dramatic setting between two steep-sided creeks right along the coast. The buttresses are a very quirky feature of the broch. They had to be added soon after construction as the walls began to slump. Unfortunately the weather meant it wasn’t possible to take many recording shots of the site, but it is very unusual as huge stone slabs had been installed at a later date within the broch, to form partitions.

We walked past the Skaill excavations being run by the University of the Highlands and Islands and the site of ruined farm buildings, a Norse hall and burial site, before heading down the road to Blackhammer Cairn and Taversoe Tuick Cairn, both of which date to the Neolithic period. The latter is really unusual as it has two storeys!

I’ll post photos when I can take them off my camera.

Many thanks to Dr Steve Dockrill and Dr Julie Bond for their kind hospitality and arranging our stay on Rousay, and to the site staff and volunteers for all your help, advice and witty banter (especially the crew at Cedarlee – Bronwyn, Alice and Joe)! I really enjoyed being on this little island for the last week and hope to come back soon. Next time I’ll bring windproofs!

Advertisements

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s