Things stepped up a gear in the last few days. We were able to safely access the intra-mural galleries inside Mousa broch – certainly not something to do without hard hats and safety gear! Deep in the heart of the broch you are very up close and personal with the meeting storm petrels – you can hear the chicks tweet within the walls.

Team photo (top): James Hepher, Mike Jack, Marta Pilarska, Dr Lyn Wilson, Li Sou, Dr Val Turner, Dr Andy Wilson

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The path to Mousa broch (wheeled trolley in the distance!)

 

Me and Lyn recorded the broch interior with the Z+F 5016 – a scanner with intergrated lighting and HDR imaging, which made it ideal for recording in dark areas, like the intra-mural cells built into the base of the broch, and for very clear colour data of the wall tops (bottom right). James and Marta took many exterior scans of Mousa using the Leica P40 while Andy and Mike scanned the galleries and passageways. We also used a giant tripod to scan from high inside the broch ( below left).

We were all glad we brought our “on-site vehicles” (aka garden trollies) for moving kit across Mousa. It’s less than half a kilometre away from the ferry drop off point and a very leisurely stroll for those exploring the island without survey equipment, but we had the true “Shetland pony” experience of pulling and pushing our carts along with full loads of tripods, cameras and scanners! Many thanks to the kind staff of the Mousa Boat (https://www.mousa.co.uk/) for helping us with moving kit, taking us over to the island over the last few days and for sharing the fascinating history of Mousa.

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Taking survey kit to site on wheels

On the final day at Mousa my PhD supervisor at Shetland Amenity Trust, Dr Val Turner, visited to see us in action. It was great to discuss this exciting project together, and the next day she showed us around one of the other Iron Age sites I am researching: Old Scatness (I’ll talk about this in my next post!). In the evening we visited St Ninian’s Isle and Sumburgh Head, where we saw many puffins (we might have taken as many photos of puffins as of the broch… they seem to love being photographed!!).

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